what happed when you got back?

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bigmo
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My Welcome Home

Post by bigmo » Mon Jun 12, 2006 7:58 pm

When I got home, my parents had arranged a small parade to one of the local fire halls where the local VFW honored me. A few days later I was interviewed for our local TV station and she asked me how it felt to be a hero. I answered that I was not a hero, I was just a soldier doing my job. It was not until a few years later when I was seeing a counselor for my PTSD that she changed my perspective. She asked me how the people who lived in Kuwait saw me. Wow! One statement that changed the way I saw myself. We are all heroes in someone's eyes. A few years after that, a woman I had only met hours before sincerely thanked me for what I did. It brought tears to my eyes.
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bilbo37
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Post by bilbo37 » Mon Jun 12, 2006 9:50 pm

Glad to see you here bigmo. Thanks for your service.
bigmo
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Thanks

Post by bigmo » Tue Jun 13, 2006 8:17 am

Thank you, Bilbo, not only for thanking me but also for serving our country! Before I went to Desert Storm I never could have imagined the bond you develop with others that were there. I remember feeling guilty when this new Iraqi war started because I felt I should have been there with my brothers and sisters. My heart and prayers go out to ALL members of the military regardless of when they served.
rodneyw71
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Re: Thanks

Post by rodneyw71 » Fri Jun 16, 2006 8:48 pm

bigmo wrote:Thank you, Bilbo, not only for thanking me but also for serving our country! Before I went to Desert Storm I never could have imagined the bond you develop with others that were there. I remember feeling guilty when this new Iraqi war started because I felt I should have been there with my brothers and sisters. My heart and prayers go out to ALL members of the military regardless of when they served.
I felt the exact same way and still do, thats why I have been thinking about going in to the Guard, The Army recruiter called me yesterday about joing the guard but I don't want to go to the Warrier refresher cource. The Guard unit here is transportation (Truck drivers), Which is what I do for a living, they wanted to send me to training. I told them if they want me I'll join, but I don't want go through basic again.
Desert Storm, KFIA, Dec. '90- May '91
RAF Alconbury, UK. '90-'92
KI. Sawyer AFB, MI. '92
434th ARW/LRS, Grissom ARB, IN. 2007-Present
OIF 506th ELRS, Kirkuk, Iraq Sept. '09-Jan. '10
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bilbo37
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Post by bilbo37 » Fri Jun 16, 2006 9:46 pm

Keep pushing for it, although they may be looking at getting a refresher to make sure you are physically fit. Keep us up to date on what is going on.
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RichardLowry
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Post by RichardLowry » Sat Jun 17, 2006 10:05 am

I am a Vietnam era vet. I served in nuclear submarines from 1967 to 1975. Last week I was traveling up the East Coast on my premier book signing tour for my new book, MARINES IN THE GARDEN OF EDEN.

Tuesday was my last day of the tour and I really only had one thing scheduled. I had been invited the the Marine Corps Sunset Parade at the Iwo Jima Memorial, so I had most of the day to myself.

I decided to visit Arlington Cemetary. I visited the graves of three Marines who were killed in Nasiriyah, the relatively new exhbit called Faces of the Fallen and the changing of the guard at the tomb of the Unknown Soldiers.

I had taken the tram up the hill and after the changing of the guard, I rode the shuttle back to the visitor's center. Just as the tour bus was approaching the visitor center, the narrator said, "If you have served our country in the military, please raise your hand."

There were only three of us on the bus. I raised my hand for a few seconds. The tour guide then said, "please show your appreciation for these veterans."

Everyone politely applauded and I thought that I had just received the only public recognition I would ever get for my service. As the bus rolled to a stop, a family - mother, father, son and daughter - rose to get off the bus. The mother turned to me and softly said - "Thank you."

I was blown away.
rodneyw71
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Post by rodneyw71 » Sat Jun 17, 2006 10:33 am

bilbo37 wrote:Keep pushing for it, although they may be looking at getting a refresher to make sure you are physically fit. Keep us up to date on what is going on.
The Guard recruiter wanted to see if I was interested and said I could go with them on a weekend drill. I have a friend who went to the refresher course and the drill instructers gave him a hard time because he was alot older than the other guys. Hell they'd love me, my hair is gray on the sides. I am physically fit, I drive a garbage truck and throw trash all day, 200 stops a day. I already went through basic, they could just train me as I go.
Desert Storm, KFIA, Dec. '90- May '91
RAF Alconbury, UK. '90-'92
KI. Sawyer AFB, MI. '92
434th ARW/LRS, Grissom ARB, IN. 2007-Present
OIF 506th ELRS, Kirkuk, Iraq Sept. '09-Jan. '10
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mcann
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Post by mcann » Sat Jun 17, 2006 9:07 pm

I am still waiting to be called back. I did 10 years and and i miss it. if it wasnt for my job i would be right in the suc. 8O
Doc Cann
Desert Storm Dec1990- July1991
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paulnola
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Lots of dreams, not really bad...

Post by paulnola » Fri Oct 20, 2006 4:51 pm

Southern California did us up right after returning, there were several parades and lots of well wishes and support from the public. We felt sincerely welcomed home, and sometimes I think people went a little overboard in their enthusiasm for us as a way to collectively make up for the way the Viet Nam vets were treated.
I still have lots of vivid, detailed dreams, not usually bad, but very strange, in a kind of reality-distorted way.
Sirens, sand, the smell of jet fuel and oil smoke bring up lots of instant memories and sights in my mind.
I was very fortunate to not have to see any of my compatriots get wounded or killed, but it is still a very strange, almost surreal time to think about.
My health was never the same after being over there, so every time I go to the VA hospital I think about things.
Odd as it may sound, those 7 months in the Gulf were very happy times to me.
USMC 1988-92
Desert Shield/Desert Storm
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bilbo37
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Re: Lots of dreams, not really bad...

Post by bilbo37 » Fri Oct 20, 2006 9:49 pm

paulnola wrote:Southern California did us up right after returning, there were several parades and lots of well wishes and support from the public. We felt sincerely welcomed home, and sometimes I think people went a little overboard in their enthusiasm for us as a way to collectively make up for the way the Viet Nam vets were treated.
I still have lots of vivid, detailed dreams, not usually bad, but very strange, in a kind of reality-distorted way.
Sirens, sand, the smell of jet fuel and oil smoke bring up lots of instant memories and sights in my mind.
I was very fortunate to not have to see any of my compatriots get wounded or killed, but it is still a very strange, almost surreal time to think about.
My health was never the same after being over there, so every time I go to the VA hospital I think about things.
Odd as it may sound, those 7 months in the Gulf were very happy times to me.
Welcome to the site... Thank you for your service...

Don't feel bad about it sounding odd.. Brothers in arms... Has a feel to it that is not like much else...
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SaucyWench
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Re: Lots of dreams, not really bad...

Post by SaucyWench » Fri Oct 20, 2006 10:26 pm

paulnola wrote:people went a little overboard in their enthusiasm for us as a way to collectively make up for the way the Viet Nam vets were treated.
Sadly, I agree.

the smell of jet fuel and oil smoke bring up lots of instant memories and sights in my mind.
Chopper sounds, dust storms, and diesel fumes for me...

Welcome to the forum. :wink: Are you in NO or GA?
rodneyw71
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Re: Lots of dreams, not really bad...

Post by rodneyw71 » Sat Oct 21, 2006 8:30 am

paulnola wrote:Southern California did us up right after returning, there were several parades and lots of well wishes and support from the public. We felt sincerely welcomed home, and sometimes I think people went a little overboard in their enthusiasm for us as a way to collectively make up for the way the Viet Nam vets were treated.
I still have lots of vivid, detailed dreams, not usually bad, but very strange, in a kind of reality-distorted way.
Sirens, sand, the smell of jet fuel and oil smoke bring up lots of instant memories and sights in my mind.
I was very fortunate to not have to see any of my compatriots get wounded or killed, but it is still a very strange, almost surreal time to think about.
My health was never the same after being over there, so every time I go to the VA hospital I think about things.
Odd as it may sound, those 7 months in the Gulf were very happy times to me.
What was the name of the Air guard base in New orleans, they had A-10's . They were in DS. with us.
Desert Storm, KFIA, Dec. '90- May '91
RAF Alconbury, UK. '90-'92
KI. Sawyer AFB, MI. '92
434th ARW/LRS, Grissom ARB, IN. 2007-Present
OIF 506th ELRS, Kirkuk, Iraq Sept. '09-Jan. '10
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SaucyWench
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Post by SaucyWench » Thu Nov 09, 2006 6:30 am

liznoraas wrote:Well I want to thank all of you MEN that served.
So, I have time and go browsing back on old posts. What exactly do you mean by writing that? Particularly in bold like that? Image I know I had been rather upfront with you from the first time I posted, but that comment is rather degrading to the many women who served. I just find it odd for you to be a woman and say it that way. Or, maybe I shouldn't.
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Big Lew
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Post by Big Lew » Wed Dec 27, 2006 1:20 pm

Dagger X-Ray wrote:When I started yawning kinda early last night, wifey asked me if everything was ok and I told her I hadn't been sleeping well the last few nights...maybe some odd dreams or something and that I wasn't really sure. I got the usual "so what is it your dreaming abouot this time?" crap she usually gives me. I have shared quite a bit of my experiences with her but she'll never understand and I hate that.
I know how you feel Dagger, and it is frustrating. I have thought several times that the only way to show someone a fraction of what you have experienced was to take them to the rifle range and tell them to get behind a target and take cover. Then tell them maybe you'll get shot and killed, and maybe you won't, you'll just have to take your chances. Of course none of us could ever do that to friends or loved ones, but the idea itself might carry a big message to them. I have trouble talking about it to them as it is, knowing that they won't understand. I guess we all have to deal with our nightmares as best we can and in our own way.
C-Btry 6th BN, 1st FA
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Rose Barracks, Vilseck(GRAF)
"STEEL ON TARGET!"
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SaucyWench
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Re: hmmm

Post by SaucyWench » Wed Dec 27, 2006 8:30 pm

Dagger X-Ray wrote:
brokenclone wrote:Well you fuckers musta just got the shit end of the stick? Upon returning to Germany from Nurnberg (there's no fuckin M in Nurnberg people)
We had a red carpet and a full Army Marching band and when we got back to post there were all the families and friends and so forth there to greet us upon our arrival. Who else were we expecting? All we wanted to see was our close family and friends... I didn't get all bent when no one kissed my ass about going to Desert Storm. Hell I'm proud of my service and would do it again, no questions asked!

I bet this guy bolo'd out of basic on the 2nd day cuz he could button all his pockets. His "supposed" experiences were probably those of his big brother or father while he sat with his mommy sucking his thumb waiting on a real soldier to come home. Its goobs like this that give real dumbasses a bad name (please pardon my french).
:lol:

Sorry for digging up old bones, but that was funny. Actually Nuernburg can be spelled either way, for anyone reading who might actually want to learn something.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/N%C3%BCrnb ... guation%29
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