Things you hate since the war.

Please visit this area and participate in various diffrent topics of discussion.
Post Reply
User avatar
redfish
Good Soldiers Never Die
Posts: 1009
Joined: Sun Oct 25, 2009 7:36 pm
Your Gulf War Unit: 24th Infantry Division, 197th Infantry Brigage, 72 Engr Co.
Location: North Carolina

Re: Things you hate since the war.

Post by redfish » Sun Aug 01, 2010 11:52 am

Flies that just crawl right in your mouth or nose.
Shield/Storm
18th Airborne Corps
24th Infantry Division
197th Infantry 72 ENGR CO
Assault and Barrier Pltn
"Sledgehammer"
User avatar
xrammyx
Vet
Posts: 160
Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2010 3:50 am
Your Gulf War Unit: 1st Armored Division HHB 6/3 ADA
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Contact:

Re: Things you hate since the war.

Post by xrammyx » Sun Aug 01, 2010 11:57 am

redfish wrote:Flies that just crawl right in your mouth or nose.
I just have to say that I might have ate a few while i was trying to brush them away from my plate at the meal truck...
HHB 6/3 ADA
Schwabach, Germany
Desert Shield/Storm
User avatar
redfish
Good Soldiers Never Die
Posts: 1009
Joined: Sun Oct 25, 2009 7:36 pm
Your Gulf War Unit: 24th Infantry Division, 197th Infantry Brigage, 72 Engr Co.
Location: North Carolina

Re: Things you hate since the war.

Post by redfish » Sun Aug 01, 2010 1:22 pm

protein
Shield/Storm
18th Airborne Corps
24th Infantry Division
197th Infantry 72 ENGR CO
Assault and Barrier Pltn
"Sledgehammer"
User avatar
xrammyx
Vet
Posts: 160
Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2010 3:50 am
Your Gulf War Unit: 1st Armored Division HHB 6/3 ADA
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Contact:

Re: Things you hate since the war.

Post by xrammyx » Sun Aug 01, 2010 1:25 pm

redfish wrote:protein
that's what everyone keeps telling me, LOL
HHB 6/3 ADA
Schwabach, Germany
Desert Shield/Storm
Jetmech
Recruit
Posts: 20
Joined: Sun Feb 21, 2010 10:45 pm
Your Gulf War Unit: C BTRY 4/5 FA Gun2
Location: Utah

Re: Things you hate since the war.

Post by Jetmech » Fri Oct 15, 2010 2:23 am

I react to smells. I can NOT have dirty diapers inside my house. I don't care if he/she IS just a baby, it is human waste and I can't bare the smell, take it outside.

I also HATE the smell of anything dead or burning hair or flesh. I will NOT let my wife turn her curling iron up to high because the smell scares the hell out of me and I got to reassure myself of where I am.

I HATE dogs! Medium to large stupid barking dogs in large groups freak me out. I will NEVER be able to forget seeing those dogs in Safwan ripping apart corpses and fighting over them. I don't even want to watch the "Dog whisperer" on TV.

Sudden loud noises, I remember when we got back and the first live fire field problem we had, it felt like my head was going to explode. I FREAKED OUT! I went to an Army shrink who told me I was a wimp and stop crying like a baby. I countered and told him that, "I PULLED THAT TRIGGER EVERY TIME I WAS TOLD TO! I AM NOT SAYING THAT I WILL NOT FIGHT! HOW THE HELL DO I DEAL WITH WHAT I DID AND WHAT I HAVE SEEN?!?! YOU CAN AIM A WEAPON AT SOMEONE AND IT AINT MURDER UNTIL YOU PULL THE TRIGGER, I PULLED THAT TRIGGER! I WAS OK WITH THE DEAD SOLDIERS, BUT YOU DIDN"T SEE THAT HIGHWAY TO SAFWAN! GAH!!!" Needless to say I went on a tirade and rebuked him because he had never seen combat. God Damned REMF!!! He assigned me to an "Anger management class", I did it and returned to my unit still pissed off at the college boy for rebuking me like that. I still get pissed when I think about it.

I guess I also have a problem with our local Police. I busted my ass to ensure our freedoms were preserved and I see local news reports of cops writing $100 tickets to people floating in lakes on water mattresses or inner-tubes WITHOUT life preservers. Isn't the air mattress/inner-tubes floatation enough? It seems as though our government is trying to save ALL stupid people. I know every state has their "stupid laws", but to be retarded enough to enforce them to the fullest extent is on the OFFICER. SERVE AND PROTECT!!! DO NOT act as the government tax collector!!! I also HATE the seatbelt/helmet laws! YES! I wear a helmet when riding my motorcycle (saved my life). YES! I wear a seatbelt when driving/riding in a car. If you are stupid enough to NOT wear them, Darwin may or may not make sure you live long enough to reproduce, it is YOUR CHOICE. Criminalizing either one is taking away our FREEDOMS/collecting taxes. I did NOT put my life on the line for Government to get rich off taking away our freedoms. Police are the faces that enforce the laws that our out of control government has written. When this Government fails, they will go first. WATCH...

I also have most of the same as the rest I have read here. I will NOT hunt or go camping, I call it organized suffering. I have gotten better over the years, but when I get stressed, all of my suppressed emotions all come out. Mostly in the form of anger though.
User avatar
Dagger X-Ray
Good Soldiers Never Die
Posts: 1899
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 1:35 pm
Your Gulf War Unit: 2nd Brigade 1st Infantry Division
Location: Central Florida
Contact:

Re: Things you hate since the war.

Post by Dagger X-Ray » Fri Oct 15, 2010 7:23 am

Trust me brother, we all understand. Hang in there and keep talking, don't bottle it up anymore.
Dagger X-Ray - ARMY
(12/91 - present) - miss the service
(9/90 - 12/91) 2nd Bde 1st Infantry Division - Desert Shield / Desert Storm Combat VET
(9/88 - 9/90) C-17th Signal Battalion of 22nd Signal Brigade - Sachsenhausen Bar Scene VET
(4/88 - 9/88) AIT Fort Gordon, Ga
(12/87 - 3/88) Basic Training Fort Jackson, SC
"People sleep peacefully in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf."
-George Orwell
"I am a soldier, I fight where I am told, and I win where I fight."
- General George Patton
Image
User avatar
redfish
Good Soldiers Never Die
Posts: 1009
Joined: Sun Oct 25, 2009 7:36 pm
Your Gulf War Unit: 24th Infantry Division, 197th Infantry Brigage, 72 Engr Co.
Location: North Carolina

Re: Things you hate since the war.

Post by redfish » Fri Oct 15, 2010 8:10 am

Jetmech,
you and I got alot in common. Anger is my go to emotion. Are you seeing somebody at the VA for this now? You sound like the majority of us on here. PTSD symptoms are remarkably similar in everyone that has it. When I sit in group and here 'Nam vets or Storm vets or Korea vets talk about their lives it is just like me. I think to myself, wow, I do that too or yeah I felt that way. Same with your post. I think, yeah man, welcome home brother I'm right there with ya.
Shield/Storm
18th Airborne Corps
24th Infantry Division
197th Infantry 72 ENGR CO
Assault and Barrier Pltn
"Sledgehammer"
Jetmech
Recruit
Posts: 20
Joined: Sun Feb 21, 2010 10:45 pm
Your Gulf War Unit: C BTRY 4/5 FA Gun2
Location: Utah

Re: Things you hate since the war.

Post by Jetmech » Wed Oct 27, 2010 7:18 pm

I start class on Nov 10th. I have been seeing the VA councilor for about a year now and he recommends I go.
User avatar
redfish
Good Soldiers Never Die
Posts: 1009
Joined: Sun Oct 25, 2009 7:36 pm
Your Gulf War Unit: 24th Infantry Division, 197th Infantry Brigage, 72 Engr Co.
Location: North Carolina

Re: Things you hate since the war.

Post by redfish » Thu Oct 28, 2010 7:09 am

What's the class?
Shield/Storm
18th Airborne Corps
24th Infantry Division
197th Infantry 72 ENGR CO
Assault and Barrier Pltn
"Sledgehammer"
Jetmech
Recruit
Posts: 20
Joined: Sun Feb 21, 2010 10:45 pm
Your Gulf War Unit: C BTRY 4/5 FA Gun2
Location: Utah

Re: Things you hate since the war.

Post by Jetmech » Thu Oct 28, 2010 12:35 pm

I will let you know the details on the 10th.
Elevenbravo87
Recruit
Posts: 10
Joined: Mon Dec 20, 2010 7:42 am
Your Gulf War Unit: Charlie co. 3/15 Inf. 24th ID(M)

Re: Things you hate since the war.

Post by Elevenbravo87 » Tue Dec 21, 2010 3:55 pm

I hate flies with a passion, as well as really hot days and I haven't been to the beach in 20 years do to the sand. I also hate the smell of burnt meat brings back alot of really bad memories. Diesal fumes get me sometimes, but its not always bad memories with that smell.

I also hate non hacking never served civilians telling me that it was not a "real war"....and I always tell them that it looked pretty goddamn real from where I was and my buddies tha were KIA and WIA thought it was pretty fucking real as well. I also ask them how many "real wars" have they fought in? Shuts them the hell up every time.
27th FEB. 1991... THE ANGELS WERE CRYING AS THEY CARRIED MY BROTHERS AWAY
InSearch
Recruit
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Dec 27, 2010 7:22 am
Your Gulf War Unit: United States Marine Corps

Re: Things you hate since the war.

Post by InSearch » Wed Dec 29, 2010 11:01 am

This is just a post from someone that wants to learn more about what stressors were involved with many of the Desert Storm veterans relative to ongoing PTSD, twenty years down the road. I understand if most want to keep these thoughts private and it is too intimate or painful to share. I never really heard much PTSD discussion among ODS veterans before I found and began to follow this forum.

I have a host of combat experiences (Foreign and Domestic) and I have never really felt any issues that can be described as PTSD within me. My experiences are as follows:
• A young Marine in OD Shield/Storm that found my war confusing on what was actually happening and it was over before I knew it (the anticipation was something at a whole different level). As I have read this forum, my tour didn’t seem as kinetic as others. We had our moments and were in harm’s way a couple of times. Being new to the unit and the Military (at the time), I did become extremely close to my fellow Marines.
• As a Police Officer in what is often described as “one of the most violent cities in America”, most of my career was spent as part of a Gun/Drug/Felony suppression unit that focused on street level and investigative follow up targeting the most violent criminal networks in the city. I have been involved in gunfights, bad guy ambushes, street fights, car chases and etc. I have witnessed friends / colleagues killed and maimed (some permanently). The violence included innocent civilians (including children) as well as low/mid/upper level villains killed and/or permanently maimed by gunfire and a multitude of methods of violence. Over time, my unit added duties of SWAT/WMD response/Civil Disobedience in addition to our suppression mission.
• After 911 and beginning of Iraq War, I felt a need to once again serve my country with all the skills I learned in my Military and Police experience. I enlisted in the Army (NG BDE getting activated in a different state) as an 11B and eventually became a team leader. I served in the environs of Baghdad and eventually in the city once the sectarian violence became a main focus of the war. This was the beginning of a bloody period and I have known fellow soldiers in my BN killed and had friends that were wounded. Just like streets of America, I also witnessed acts of violence. During this tour, I earned a CIB and a Purple Heart.
• A little less than two years later (after returning to PD-same unit- for a short stint), I returned to Iraq. This time I served as a Civilian SME in a DOD program in which I (and others like me) were/are issued a weapon and assigned to a BN (part of their TO&E). Our day to day tasks included accompanying infantrymen and Cavalry soldiers (who have a dismounted mission in these wars) at the PLT/CO level on the ground during regular patrols and other combat operations. We are a combat enabler with a task that adds value to the mission. This involved two months shy of a year and half in Iraq, in the most kinetic area for this time period of the war. Again, I know those who were killed and wounded; part of my duties was to try and help connect the dots to assist in locating those responsible.
• As I currently sit in Afghanistan, I am a Civilian SME in a DOD program and I have even more responsibility in supporting U.S. and Host National forces. This position has been described by one of my colleagues (he happens to also be veteran ODS/OIF/former COP) as “Professional angler who helps the Military work toward getting the big fish”. This current assignment takes a culmination of all my experiences rolled into one to achieve the objective and we are near the “tip of the spear”. This has involved firefights and all kinds of kinetic operations. I have again personally known Soldiers and civilians who have paid the ultimate sacrifice or have been badly injured.

I can honestly say that I have never really had any feelings that match up with those described as PTSD. Sometimes I reflect on these experiences, mostly in relation to what I learned and especially enemy TTPs. These experiences have been the most important learning lessons of my life. I can’t remember losing any night’s sleep over an encounter. While in battle (foreign and domestic) I have seen days that are good, bad or seem unforgiving. But there were learning “take a way’s” in every one of these events. All these experiences are part of my life and help define who I am. I think all these collective experiences have made me a better person and others in my life seem to agree. From my viewpoint the positives have outweighed the negatives. I have found no more rewarding experience in my life to work hand in hand with the young Soldiers who bear the brunt of our current wars and to have them look up to us (more seasoned enablers) for our knowledge. This is humbling.
As I have followed this forum, I have seen a lot of “traffic” about anger, aggression and alluding to hurting the ones you love in a bout of anger. I could never envision having this much lack of control particularly towards a person I care about. I look upon aggression as a calculated tool in confronting the enemy and neutralizing the threat. Also, an unrelated “add on” is I enjoy any opportunity to go to the beach and watch the waves from such a massive creation of GOD. And air horns brought back thoughts of the “storm” back in the early 90’s but my reaction faded away over time.
I came to this forum to just read about experiences to reconnect with some fading memories of “my first time”. But it seems to be more of a PTSD and Anger forum. There are some regular stories, but I feel that much is focused heavily towards a negative tone. I never really got many of these negative verbal responses when I talked to ODS veterans over the years; it seems that some thing has changed. But I don’t want to say that it is the entire forum, maybe these type discussions just focus my attention much more.
Is there any way to explain to a fellow veteran all the experiences and stressors from ODS that have manifested since the end of this war? As I often develop a “big brother—little brother” relationship with the soldiers I serve in proximity, this may help me when discussing some of these issues with them if they come up. As the main effort for the fight transitions from “Big Army” to “Special Army” and its enablers, the kids will be transitioning away from being in the middle of the fight. With the seasoned Professionals of the “Special Army” expanding their role to absorb the majority of responsibility for the fight; they just don’t seem to have discussions centered on these types of stressors and PTSD. As they often show the enemy with their actions, they keep “bringing it” tour after tour and project a statement that says “we can do this all decade”. The enemy loses 999 out of 1000 times.
The kids aren’t too shabby themselves as they remain aggressive, smart, innovative, reliable and productive warriors that will give you 125%. This is even with multiple combat tours that most have experienced. I want to see these qualities continue as they transition into tomorrow’s leaders of our Nation. Any insights to educate me would be greatly appreciated.
User avatar
redfish
Good Soldiers Never Die
Posts: 1009
Joined: Sun Oct 25, 2009 7:36 pm
Your Gulf War Unit: 24th Infantry Division, 197th Infantry Brigage, 72 Engr Co.
Location: North Carolina

Re: Things you hate since the war.

Post by redfish » Wed Dec 29, 2010 12:26 pm

Wow, your service to our country is and has been commendable. It seems you have evolved into to a tremendous liason between assets in our military. Thank you for all you continue to do. I appreciate your post it has caused me a moment to evaluate things myself and question why. This is my humble opinion on your post and I hope an answer or a possible one.

Only one out of every 5 combat vets return with PTSD. This means that 80% of combat vets experience the same events but are able to process the experiences and memories normally and return to a baseline level of anxiety, fear, anger etc... Only 20% remeain unable to process the events and thus it remains unprocessed and un-dealt with. This causes continued nightmares, flasbacks, etc. due to the brain trying to subconsciously process the traumatic events.

In many cases, including mine, these unprocessed traumas can go dormant only to become exacerbated after many years and then can become completely debilitating. These events can be re-exposed due to age or stress or the removal of coping skills that have been developed. When I first returned from storm I had nightmares every night, constant flashbacks and a multitude of problems. Over time I turned to alcohol to cope with the issues (self medicated). I turned to the VA for help but at that time PTSD was still widely not understood well medically so went undiagnosed; therefore, untreated. So I continued to self medicate. After suffering for years I was able to quit drinking and substituted work. I worked almost every day which also kept the trauma memories at bay. Well 2 years ago the market crunch came and my work hours were cut in half. This created down time in my world which caused my brain to go back to the unprocessed traumas and begin to again struggle with the events. Causing the return of nightmares, flashbacks etc.

The natural response to PTSD at this level is to try to process what happened. So, we reach out to others in hopes to find a "kinship" or regain that comradere and to be re-assured that we are'nt alone or "CRAZY". This forum allows that to happen in our case. We can express ourselves freely without the fear of being thought or of "accused of" being crazy or psycho.

Before my symptoms resurfaced, I had no use for such ventilation and had no idea this type of site existed. Now I avoided all topics like this to cope subcosciously. I thought I had no issues until 2 years ago it all slammed down on me.

80% of vets never have issue with these memories so one would rarely here from them. They have moved on. 20% of us still suffer and struggle with the events from there soo we are still trying to deal with it by posting here.
Not everything on this site is PTSD related so I do hope you enjoy those parts. You question is something I've struggle with too. Like why me and why now. I hope I answered your questions.
Shield/Storm
18th Airborne Corps
24th Infantry Division
197th Infantry 72 ENGR CO
Assault and Barrier Pltn
"Sledgehammer"
User avatar
FA1SGret
Lifer
Posts: 874
Joined: Sun Mar 04, 2007 8:41 am
Your Gulf War Unit: 3rd Bn 17th Field Artillery
Location: Missouri

Re: Things you hate since the war.

Post by FA1SGret » Thu Dec 30, 2010 8:12 am

InSearch,

I'm glad you're fine ... really I am.

My perspestive ... hurting others isn't a conscience thought. For me, it isn't fists ... it's outbursts. Mostly not intentional or calculated, but reactive ... overly reactive ... Hyperreactive.

This forum may seem negative ...

never mind.

I'm glad your fine
Desert Shield/Desert Storm/Cease Fire
3rd Bn 17th Field Artillery
210th FA Bde
DS (OPCON) 3/2 ACR, GS 1 ID
FIRE MISSION!
User avatar
sgt Jake
Soldier
Posts: 59
Joined: Wed Dec 29, 2010 5:49 pm
Your Gulf War Unit: Eagle Troop 3ACR

Re: Things you hate since the war.

Post by sgt Jake » Thu Dec 30, 2010 1:16 pm

what do I hate since the war.....? I hate that I struggle to forget everything about it, and when I become dangerously close to forgetting for a day or two, I find myself sneaking out to the garage late at night and digging out my lockerbox of souveniers and cracking the seal on this giant ziplock with enemy field jacket and sneaking one sniff and I am right there, all over again. suddenly the garage light turns on, and I snap, realizing the wife has signaled me to put it together because our son will be up for school in a bit. I pack EVERYTHING away till next time. thats what I hate.
War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. The decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks that nothing is worth war is much worse. The person who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing which is more important than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature and has no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself.
- J o h n S t e w a r t M i l l
Post Reply