article in The Observer

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Saskia
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article in The Observer

Post by Saskia » Mon Nov 24, 2003 4:51 am

I found this yesterday evening and I think it's pretty interesting...

Take care all,

Saskia

Soldiers to sue over new Gulf War syndrome

Mark Townsend
Sunday November 23, 2003
The Observer

Dozens of soldiers who served in Iraq are to sue the Government, claiming they are suffering from a new form of Gulf War syndrome.
Multiple vaccinations given in the run-up to the conflict are being blamed for chronic pains, stomach problems, rashes, swelling, fever, depression and anxiety.

Lawyers and medical experts say the symptoms are identical to those which affected thousands of veterans after the 1991 Gulf conflict.

The Observer has learnt that 13 soldiers have launched legal actions against the Ministry of Defence over what is being called Gulf War II syndrome. A similar number of 'robust' cases are to be launched in weeks.

In addition, a former MoD employee has obtained the medical records of another 40 Iraq veterans also suffering similar symptoms. Each case could cost the Government £1 million in damages.

Mark McGhee of Manchester-based Linda Myers Solicitors, said servicemen were coming forward all the time. 'Previously healthy servicemen received inoculations and suffered serious reactions. Now their jobs, livelihoods and their families are being affected,' he said.

The allegations come ahead of the inquest tomorrow into the death of Major Ian Hill, former chairman of the National Gulf Veterans' and Families' Association. Hill suffered a severe reaction to vaccinations he was given and was sent home from the Gulf. However, Army doctors were unable to determine what was wrong with him.

The father-of-four subsequently suffered from a range of illnesses including Q fever, an infection that stops the brain producing cells quickly enough to replace those that die. The MoD disputed that his illness was a result of service and he was denied a pension until shortly before his death in March 2001 at the age of 54.

At the two-day inquest in Warrington, lawyers will argue his deployment to the Gulf and subsequent illnesses contributed to his early death. More than 550 veterans have died since the first Gulf war.

A spokesman for the Ministry of Defence said 12 servicemen from the latest conflict had signed up to a health assessment programme while 7,000 former Gulf veterans are to be screened
The history of man is the history of crimes, and history can repeat. So information is a defense. Through this we can build, we must build, a defense against repetition.
Simon Wiesenthal
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Post by Hawk » Mon Nov 24, 2003 9:41 am

8O Saskia,

What country is this article refering to? :cry: Looks like it is happening again, maybe this time the goverments involved will have to at least acknowledge there is a problem. If anything is done about it remains to be seen.

Hawk 8)
I am only one but I am one. I can not do everything but I can Do something And because I cannot do everything I will not refuse to do the something that I can do What I can do I should do And what I should do by the grace of God I will do. Edward E. Hale
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Post by Saskia » Mon Nov 24, 2003 4:18 pm

Hawk,

The article is referring to Great Britain and I have to agree with you Hawk; it seems that history is repeating itself already.
I did some research on Major Ian Hill and came up with the article below...
Seems the stituation isn't any different from the one in the US: the British government KNEW that the given vacines would be a danger to the health of the soldiers!

MoD was warned of vaccine risk before war
By Michael Smith, Defence Correspondent
(Filed: 11/10/2003)


Tests carried out in the months before the 1991 Gulf war showed that soldiers going into conflict against Iraq should not have been given a whooping cough vaccine and a anthrax vaccine together, the Ministry of Defence admitted yesterday.

In a written parliamentary answer, Lord Bach, the defence minister, admitted that on Dec 21, 1990, three and a half weeks before the war began, the MoD was told that tests on mice had produced serious side-effects.

The troops were given the whooping cough vaccine to speed up the effects of the anthrax vaccine, Lord Bach said.

But he went on to admit that "the vaccine was not recommended for use in adults and it was not licensed for use as an adjuvant [to accelerate the effect of] to the anthrax vaccine".

The vaccines were tested on mice by the National Institute for Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC). There were no side-effects when either was used on its own.

But tests using the vaccines together "caused concern to the institute because there was evidence of severe loss of condition and weight".

The institute alerted the Department of Health to its concerns in a faxed letter. Dr Jeremy Metters, the deputy chief medical officer, regarded the letter as so important that he faxed it to the MoD that same day.

"Dr Metters recalls advising the MoD of the importance and relevance of the information from NIBSC and of their and his concerns," Lord Bach said. But the MoD decided to go ahead with the vaccinations anyway.

The Royal British Legion, which has been repeatedly critical of the MoD's response to the thousands of soldiers believed to be suffering from Gulf war syndrome, said there was a need for an urgent public inquiry.

It said one NIBSC official recalled discussing the side-effects with up to three MoD officials, but still the ministry decided to go ahead with the vaccination programme.

The Legion added that the intervals between the administration of the required series of inoculations were shortened, in contravention of the manufacturer's advice.

Lord Morris had asked about all the vaccines involved, a Royal British Legion spokesman said. Some soldiers were known to have been given as many as 28 different ones. But the MoD had failed to answer his question in full.

The Legion also asked how many service personnel were given other vaccines in conjunction with the anthrax vaccine against the manufacturer's advice and what effect that had on those involved.

Shaun Rusling, chairman of the National Gulf Veterans'and Families' Association, was a medic in the Territorial Army when he was sent to Iraq in December 1990.

Three years later, he began suffering from a number of serious complaints. The War Pensions Agency eventually accepted that his condition was caused by his service but not that it was Gulf war syndrome.

In May last year a pensions tribunal overturned that ruling, accepting that Gulf war syndrome existed and criticising Geoff Hoon, the Defence Secretary, for allowing officials illegally to erase any mention of it from Mr Rusling's file.

Despite a High Court ruling in Mr Rusling's favour in June, the MoD has still to comply with legal orders that it issue him with a certificate of pension entitlement.

Mr Rusling's predecessor as chairman of the NGVFA, Major Ian Hill, died from what was believed to be Gulf war syndrome in March 2001.

He suffered a severe reaction to the vaccinations he was given and had to be sent home from the Gulf. Army doctors were unable to determine what was wrong with him.

He developed a series of major illnesses including emphysema, Tolsoa-Hunt syndrome, in which massive swelling behind the eyes causes excruciating pain, and Q-fever, an infection of the brain that stops it replacing cells fast enough to replace those that die.

The MoD refused to accept that his illness was a result of service and did not give him a full pension until two days before he died.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jh ... old111.xml
The history of man is the history of crimes, and history can repeat. So information is a defense. Through this we can build, we must build, a defense against repetition.
Simon Wiesenthal
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Post by Hawk » Tue Nov 25, 2003 10:11 am

Saskia,

Although I am not upto date on the problems British vets are having with their own goverment I do know, their goverment is still in the denial stage.
what problem there is no gws. now go away and stop bothering us.
what is interesting is on both sides of the Alantic veterans are suffering after vacinations were mixed, whether with pesticides or another vaccination. both goverments were aware this could cause problems yet both decided to proceed, and are continueing to do so, while denieing any knowledge.
I have to wonder who benifits ($$) from this?

Hawk 8)
I am only one but I am one. I can not do everything but I can Do something And because I cannot do everything I will not refuse to do the something that I can do What I can do I should do And what I should do by the grace of God I will do. Edward E. Hale
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