Introduction/question

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Chad
Recruit
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Jun 29, 2007 1:30 am
Your Gulf War Unit: Please add your Unit
Location: Pacific North West

Introduction/question

Post by Chad » Fri Jun 29, 2007 1:36 am

Hey all,

Just wanted to introduce myself first of all. I am PFC Horky of the U.S. Army (as of yesterday). I just got done with MEPS and will be shipping out in August. MOS of 13M


I have some questions I hope someone can answer. I've been doing some additional research on MLRS MOS's tonight. Something came to my attention just today that I wasn't aware of.

1) I heard this MOS is being phased out
2) I heard this is a very dead-end job
3) From seeing AIT is only 4 weeks for this MOS, it seems too easy

If you know any information on this MOS please enlighten me. I haven't quite found the info I'm looking for. The main reason I chose this job is 1) it was the best one out of my choices - or so I thought, and 2) it is just temporary, once I get my ASVAB score high enough I will try out for Special Forces (I missed the qualification score by only 3 points on my GT section, everything else was at least 50 points over average).

So if you know any "hidden" aspects of the MOS of 13M that I obviously don't know about, please let me know!! I know it's pretty much too late to make any changes, but at least I'll know for the future weather to stick with this MOS or continue to SF or some other choice.

Thank you,
Chad
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Dagger X-Ray
Good Soldiers Never Die
Posts: 1899
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 1:35 pm
Your Gulf War Unit: 2nd Brigade 1st Infantry Division
Location: Central Florida
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Post by Dagger X-Ray » Fri Jun 29, 2007 7:00 am

Welcome Chad,

Many times a rumor is just that...a rumor. MLRS is a very important part of the Army's arsenal. I doubt they will phase MLRS out anytime soon. I would say MLRS was responsible for a vary large number of the artillery missions around 1st Infantry Division.

"The Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS) Crewmember is an important part of the Army's combat team. MLRS teams are used to support infantry and tank units while supplementing cannon artillery in combat, but they also have responsibilities during peacetime. The MLRS launches various missiles and ammunition in quick strikes during combat."

http://www.goarmy.com/JobDetail.do?id=51

Hang around here because we have some artillery unit guys here that I am sure would LOVE to talk to you about your MOS. I envy you having just gone in, I miss my Army days.

Keep 1 thing in mind throughout your basic training and AIT, ITS A HEADGAME!!!! You will have drills screaming at you, threatening you, and so on, play their game and have fun doing it. It will all be over in a few weeks anyway. Their purpose is to break YOU down and make you one of US, a team member, not an individual anymore. The military is all about teamwork and getting the job done no matter what. Your no longer white, black, hispanic...YOUR GREEN.


p.s., come smuggle me into basic with you please ! I miss it.



.
Last edited by Dagger X-Ray on Fri Jun 29, 2007 8:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Dagger X-Ray - ARMY
(12/91 - present) - miss the service
(9/90 - 12/91) 2nd Bde 1st Infantry Division - Desert Shield / Desert Storm Combat VET
(9/88 - 9/90) C-17th Signal Battalion of 22nd Signal Brigade - Sachsenhausen Bar Scene VET
(4/88 - 9/88) AIT Fort Gordon, Ga
(12/87 - 3/88) Basic Training Fort Jackson, SC
"People sleep peacefully in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf."
-George Orwell
"I am a soldier, I fight where I am told, and I win where I fight."
- General George Patton
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Dispacther
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Your Gulf War Unit: HHC 43rd CSG / 1st Cav
Location: "Nor Kak-a-laky" N.C.

Post by Dispacther » Fri Jun 29, 2007 6:23 pm

Chad Congratulations on your enlistment .
Being I was a Signalman/PLL-TAMMS (72E/G,76C) I don't know personally about 13M . However from reading Dagger's link and understanding breauracratize , it sound like a glorified truck driver . But it is one hell of a truck . That's probably why such a short school . Just a wild guess .
Best of Luck !
Ft McClealan AL 09/83-11/83,
Ft Gordon GA 11/83-02/84
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FA1SGret
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Posts: 874
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Your Gulf War Unit: 3rd Bn 17th Field Artillery
Location: Missouri

Post by FA1SGret » Fri Jun 29, 2007 6:58 pm

13M ... Multiple Launch Rocket System ... A HUGE combat multipler. The thing is, it's heavy, and a heavy hitter ... it's use aint politically correct against insurgents, small targets, or areas where collateral damage is an issue ... but when it is used it is an awesome piece of machinery with a lot of destructive power.

Each launcher can function autonomously or in conjuction with other launchers, cannon arty units, close air, or naval gunfire, whatever the situation dictates.

They can strike very deep targets, high payoff targets, or they can support the close battle.

They can acquire targets by friendly radar, satellite, unmanned or manned aircraft, or by a forward observer.

One sobering word of caution for you and your mighty killing machine ... because you have at your finger tips the ability to wreak such massive quantities of death and destruction ... you are a top priority for the enemy to find and eliminate. Worry not though, because you will be well cared for by infantryman, tanker, fellow artilleryman, aircrews, and generals ... because you are such a HUGE combat multiplier ...

You'll go days without sleep; curse your massive beast for the near continuous maintenance requirements; you'll do day and night missions; FAARPS; find and secure firing positions, hide positions, and rearm positions; you'll shower and shave with your canteen cup, shit in a hole; eat rations that other that may be days old and cold.

When you're doing you job well you'll be hunger, tired, dirty. You'll live in your launcher for weeks or longer with two other crewmen.

Welcome to the ranks of the Field Artillery ... the KING OF BATTLE!


Forged from a cannonball
Honed to an edge
Cut like a knife
Strike like a sledge
I'm proud to be ARTILLERY
That's no lie
If you aint ARTILLERY
#$%# off and DIE!

M270 Self Propelled Loader Laucher (SPLL)
Crew 3 - driver, gunner, section chief
Dimensions
Length 22ft 6in
Width 9ft 9in
Weight 55,000lb
M270 Weapon Platform 2 x weapons pods
Performance
Range 300 miles (438km)
Load 12 rockets, two pods with six rockets each, or two missiles, two pods with two missiles each
Army Tactical Missile System (ATACMS)
Length Approximately 13ft
Diameter Approximately 24in
Range Over 100 miles (165km)
Range, Extended-Range Version over 180 miles
Propellant Solid Fuel Rocket Motor
Guidance, block I ATACMS Ring laser gyro
Guidance Block IA, II, IIA Inertial navigation with GPS
Warheads Anti-personnel, anti-material, precision anti-armour submunitions and other variants
Load Two missiles per launcher, two pods with one missile each
Desert Shield/Desert Storm/Cease Fire
3rd Bn 17th Field Artillery
210th FA Bde
DS (OPCON) 3/2 ACR, GS 1 ID
FIRE MISSION!
rodneyw71
Good Soldiers Never Die
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Your Gulf War Unit: 354th TFW
Location: Indiana

Post by rodneyw71 » Fri Jun 29, 2007 9:06 pm

Chad, Congradulation on your Enlistment, joining the Military is one of the most memorable things you will do in your life....enjoy it.
Desert Storm, KFIA, Dec. '90- May '91
RAF Alconbury, UK. '90-'92
KI. Sawyer AFB, MI. '92
434th ARW/LRS, Grissom ARB, IN. 2007-Present
OIF 506th ELRS, Kirkuk, Iraq Sept. '09-Jan. '10
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FA1SGret
Lifer
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Your Gulf War Unit: 3rd Bn 17th Field Artillery
Location: Missouri

Post by FA1SGret » Fri Jun 29, 2007 10:04 pm

Chad wrote: 1) I heard this MOS is being phased out
2) I heard this is a very dead-end job
3) From seeing AIT is only 4 weeks for this MOS, it seems too easy
1) Who knows what changes the Army will make in the future. If you think about it, the task of aligning the force to meet current and future challenges is quite daunting. I can't see the MLRS system going totally away, maybe realignment, or consolidation, or but to predict that is will go away completely seem unrealistic to me. Let's assume 13M does go away while you're in it ... they will most likely go through a process of volunteer reclassifications, then involuntary reclassifications, and maybe even discharges. I don't see it happening myself, but if it does happen I fee comfortable telling you that you will get the opportunity to participate in the process ... but time will tell and only time will tell.

2) Almost every job in the army is a dead end job. Some jobs have hard skills that can be transferred, but the context of the job doesn't transfer well at all. The army is geared toward the battlefield ... lot's of things change completely when the battlefield context is removed or altered. The more important things that you will carry with you when you leave the military is the confidence that you'll have in yourself ... you'll be a more capable adult, confident in your knowledge, your experience, and your potential. You'll know what it is really like being a team player. I've heard folks try to compare it to being on a sports team, but they're really is no comparison. You will not play on the team, you will not act like a team, you will not seem like a team, you will be a team. You have the potential to learn much from the 'school of hard knocks', you're situational awareness will improve, you're trouble shooting/problem solving will improve, decision making will improve, risk analysis will improve, leadership ability will improve ... Confidence, Candor, Courage, and Committment ... that's what you'll get out of it ... and then some.

3) The army makes almost everything dummy proof. What they will teach you in AIT is the very basic skills needed to perform at the lowest level in a launcher section ... basic operator level fire control console operations, basic communication equipment operations, basic operator level maintenacne procedures, duties and responsibilities of the crew ... all entry level shit ... AIT is the beginning of the learning curve ... you'll get the real stuff and more detailed/operational stuff when you get to your unit.

Make the most of your time ... get out and about and see the world ... take college courses ... IF it turns into a waste of time it will be because you wasted your time ... too many opportunities exist to expand your horizons.

Man! This brings back memories of me standing in formation addressing my battery ... I sure did like my soldiers.
Desert Shield/Desert Storm/Cease Fire
3rd Bn 17th Field Artillery
210th FA Bde
DS (OPCON) 3/2 ACR, GS 1 ID
FIRE MISSION!
Chad
Recruit
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Jun 29, 2007 1:30 am
Your Gulf War Unit: Please add your Unit
Location: Pacific North West

Post by Chad » Sun Jul 01, 2007 6:13 pm

Well thanks for the welcoming and information guys. I do appreciate it.

I am so looking forward to BT and AIT. It's just gonna be awesome, so much fun.

Yeah, I didn't expect the MLRS to be phased out or anything. I just got a bit worried when I read that info from those other sources. But like you said FA1SGret, only time will tell. The more I think about it the less concerned I get.

I'll be sure to stick around. I'm sure I can learn something from you all.

Anyway, you all have a good 4th!!!
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Dagger X-Ray
Good Soldiers Never Die
Posts: 1899
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 1:35 pm
Your Gulf War Unit: 2nd Brigade 1st Infantry Division
Location: Central Florida
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Post by Dagger X-Ray » Sun Jul 01, 2007 7:26 pm

Remember what I said, BASIC TRAINING IS A HEADGAME. Play their game, listen and do what you are told regardless of how much you don't like it or how tired you are or whatever. Don't do anything stupid that gets you or others in trouble, the rest of your plattoon usually is the one that gets punished for your mistake(s), guess who teaches you not to make that mistake again...the rest of the platoon.

Remember the whole time you are in basic that you will never get to do most of those things again nor would you have ever gotten to do most of them if you weren't there in basic.

When you get to AIT, invest in some disposable cameras and take pictures of you and your buddies. Get those memories on film as they happen. Don't just take pics, get pics taken of you doing things you want to remember or show off. I didn't do that and I now regret it so much.

Make the best of your basic and have fun doing it. You will be miserable a lot of the time but remember your having fun doing it.
Dagger X-Ray - ARMY
(12/91 - present) - miss the service
(9/90 - 12/91) 2nd Bde 1st Infantry Division - Desert Shield / Desert Storm Combat VET
(9/88 - 9/90) C-17th Signal Battalion of 22nd Signal Brigade - Sachsenhausen Bar Scene VET
(4/88 - 9/88) AIT Fort Gordon, Ga
(12/87 - 3/88) Basic Training Fort Jackson, SC
"People sleep peacefully in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf."
-George Orwell
"I am a soldier, I fight where I am told, and I win where I fight."
- General George Patton
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FA1SGret
Lifer
Posts: 874
Joined: Sun Mar 04, 2007 8:41 am
Your Gulf War Unit: 3rd Bn 17th Field Artillery
Location: Missouri

Post by FA1SGret » Mon Jul 02, 2007 8:41 am

How long will you be in the DEP?

Want to shoot some Artillery?

Me too, but I can't seem to find a howitzer that anyone is willing to loan me ... Ha! The ammo is a problem too ... and then finding a firing range big enough ... damn I need to win the lottery so bad.

Anybody want to contribute to the FA1SGret cannon finding and firing fund?

Basic and AIT didn't seem that hard to me. I was in good shape when I joined at 18 years old from rural Missouri. I went through OSUT training ... One Station Unit Training ... basic and AIT combined into a single 13 week program ... we stayed in the same unit (same barracks, same cadre) for both phases of our training.

Training was nothing compared to what I went through with 2nd Infantry Division in Korea. That's where I really got to learn what soldiering was about and it set the pace for the rest of my life in the Army. Lot's of high speed, low drag field exercises, alerts, and road marches. Trained hard and played hard.

One day at a time, one task at a time, one step at a time. When you're at the point where you can't stand another day, break it down to hours. When you can't stand another hour, break it down to minutes. When you can't stand another minute, break it down to seconds.

When to can't walk another kilometer, walk another 100 meters, when you think you can't do that, walk another meter.

You'll do just fine ... keep you eye on the horizon, keep your weapon clean, take care of you feet, and be aware of what's going on around you at all times ... you'll be fine.
Desert Shield/Desert Storm/Cease Fire
3rd Bn 17th Field Artillery
210th FA Bde
DS (OPCON) 3/2 ACR, GS 1 ID
FIRE MISSION!
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